Archive for the ‘Wild Harsh!’ Category

On Knock Nevis

April 27, 2008

From indie.kiev.ua, translated by Google

Joe Foster

“Knock Nevis (for Wilson Zorn and JP Jenkins)”

Who is Joe Foster, very encouraged to know. He – half of the duet English (excpet for him yet there Korean named Bonnie Jones). In 2002 from Portland, USA moved to Seoul, Yuzh.Koreya. Foster – a figure for journalists uneasy, it is difficult to clearly describe. He spam nonsense in serious conversations on music forums. Relates to colleagues with irony. Publish own improvisation on a CD-R tiny print runs – generally, at least it regalia. Considers that should his music to other people, and plans to play to death. Approves that plays trumpet, electronics and non-instruments. In statements to scratch the surface of tables, with Mic divert fidbekom, as with decorative pekinesom, and generally features vytvoryaet knows that. And all this just does not produce impression bucca and provocateurs.

Music makes no similar no matter what!

Wild harsh! No poblazhek neither equipment nor the ears – the first time should listen with apprehension, the sound pressure is replaced by unpredictable, and without looking back on the overall sound and dynamics – Foster to cling to negligence, grossly. Sounds are not able to get used to each other, nor anything that does not stratify, between passages sounded simultaneously – a huge gap. At least attention and respect for sound and capped a furious provorstva. And why is the result we get fragile hanging in the air design, ezhesekundno razletayuschayasya in the dust. But if you just f – after each collapse before its eyes remain the contours and collect such inexplicable beauty in the air lock…

There is no doubt, Joe Foster has great surprises sense of time. And, I think, in addition to that – self sufficiently to play and all vytvoryat savagery over time, rather than Hall and cherish it over.

From EARLabs

Joe Foster – Knock Nevis (For Wilson Zorn and J.P. Jenkins)

There’s an old saying that “you can’t rush a good thing” and this also applies to the new Homophoni release single by Joe Foster. This slowly, but steadily evolving experimental composition, is brimming with a variety of interesting textures, sounds, and moods.

A few seconds of silence followed by a couple of minutes of warm layers of static and high-frequency tones meet the listener until, about three-and-one-half minutes, into the track a resonant chord abruptly sounds. As the echoing chord gradually fades, the hiss of static and high-pitched microtones once again take the forefront, but bolder and louder, for the next few minutes only to be interrupted briefly by what seems to be the fleeting remnants of that droning chord. About seven-minutes into the composition, the tone begins to change. A layer of feedback along with what sounds like the rush of wind are added, giving the track a more ominous atmosphere. At about 10:45, a heavy, low-frequency feedback begins to takeover and the tone becomes even more threatening. The comforting fizz of static becomes more hazy, and a deep, undulating tone becomes the focus for the next few minutes with the only distraction being the intermittent droning of a chord. At 16:45, the boisterous tone abruptly ends and the warm whisper of static returns along with the appearance of a beautiful, chiming drone, sometimes taking the background and sometimes becoming the focal point. The final seven minutes of the composition becomes a rather unruly collage of glitch, feedback, distorted noise, transparent tones, and grainy textures. -Larry Johnson

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